Tag Archives: book club

September EDIWTB Book Club: BERTRAND COURT by Michelle Brafman

I am very excited to announce the next book for the EDIWTB book club: Bertrand Court by Michelle Brafman.

Here is what it’s about (from the Politics & Prose website):

Bertrand-CourtBrafman follows her rich and insightful first novel about family and tradition, Washing the Dead, with this compelling profile of a suburban Washington D.C. neighborhood. Moving chronologically from 1993 to 2007, the novel follows the diverse residents of the eponymous cul-de-sac, tracking their daily routines, their secrets, and their sorrows in seventeen exquisitely crafted, interlocking narratives. Brafman, an award-winning filmmaker as well as a widely published writer honored with a Special Mention in the Pushcart Prize Anthology, employs humor, deft pacing, and artful jump-cuts to vividly and warmly evoke the lives and families of policy wonks, politicos, and housewives.

So it’s 1) domestic fiction 2) made up of interlinked stories 2) that take place in DC 4) over 14 years. What could be better?

Prospect Park Books has kindly agreed to provide 20 copies of Bertrand Court to people who participate in the EDIWTB book club. If you’d like to take part in the book club, send me an email at gweiswasser@gmail.com with the following:

Name

Address

Email address

The first 20 people to sign up will receive copies of the book, which comes out this month. We’ll discuss it here on the blog in a few weeks.

 

November Book Club:STILTSVILLE by Susanna Daniel

I am excited to announce the November-into-December EDIWTB book club pick: Stiltsville, by Susanna Daniel. I've been looking for a while for the right pick, and when I came across this review of Stiltsville on Nomad Reader, I knew I had found it.

From Amazon:

Stiltsville It may be a sign of the times that many stories about marriage unfold on a stage of high emotional drama, where the sparks stop flying and start sparring, for better or worse. There may be catharsis in those kinds of stories, but there's often little joy, which is what makes this quiet and tender debut so disarmingly good. Stiltsville is a story of a marriage that begins with serendipity–that holiest of relationship grails–one warm summer day in Miami. It's 1969 when girl (Frances, the novel's clear-eyed, guileless narrator) meets boy (Dennis, who in Frances's estimation is "careless but lucky") at one of a copse of houses built on stilts in Miami's Biscayne Bay. That such a place existed is incredible now, and in the scenes that reconstruct its peculiar beauty, Susanna Daniel ushers you into an exotic and unpredictable corner of the country. It's a perfect place to fall in love, and Frances and Dennis do, without fanfare or pretense. Theirs is a love that almost instantly becomes constant and real, full of simple happiness that makes it possible to weather the storms that come.

Carrie at Nomad Reader called Stiltsville "the most emotionally engaging novel I've read in quite some time. I often struggle writing reviews for books I adore, and I found nothing to criticize in Stiltsville."

I'm sold. Who else is in?

If you'd like to read Stiltsville with the EDIWTB book club, send me an email at gweiswasser@gmail.com with your name, address, and email. Once the books are mailed out from Harper, I will set a date for the discussion. On that day, I will post a review here, and the conversation will continue in the comments. Harper has generously agreed to send books to 20 EDIWTB readers (THANK YOU HARPER!), so send in your information soon!

New Yorker “Book Club” Discussion Questions

Found this from Book Club Girl on Twitter – a New Yorker parody of book club discussion questions. Highly entertaining. These are my favorites:

1. Studying the cover of this month’s selection may provide hints to the reasons that Margy MacDougal chose this book for your group. What does the metallic font used for the title convey—pretension, or insecurity? Although the cover art is minimal, what tensions does it suggest are lurking under the superficially glossy surface of Margy’s relationship with her husband, Eric?

4. Book-club members who have actually read this book have called its plot “depressing,” “disgusting,” and “too much about poor people.” Does this suggest that you, as a reader, have a moral obligation to say that you liked the book?