TO RISE AGAIN AT A DECENT HOUR by Joshua Ferris

I’ve given Joshua Ferris three chances. The first was Then We Came To The End, the book about the effect of the dotcom bust on a downsizing ad agency and its Greek chorus of employees, which I didn’t really like despite its rave reviews. The second was The Unnamed, about a lawyer afflicted with an illness that forces him to keep walking for months at a time, which I liked better than TWCTTE but still found to be inconsistent. And finally, I just finished To Rise Again At A Decent Hour, another Ferris novel that wasn’t what I expected and ultimately disappointed.


To Rise Again At A Decent Hour is about Paul O’Rourke, a neurotic, misanthropic atheist dentist living in Brooklyn who is obsessed with the Red Sox. (Yes, that’s all relevant.) When the book opens, Paul, who is very private and controlled in what he shares with the world, finds websites and social media accounts popping up in his name. Even more troubling,the content of the accounts is vaguely anti-Semitic (Paul is not Jewish, but he’s kind of obsessed with being Jewish) and go on and on about ancient peoples who allegedly faced persecution and prejudice worse than the Jews ever did.

Much of To Rise Again At A Decent Hour focuses on religious musings about the existence of God, using a somewhat confusing storyline of a man who has traced his roots back to one of these persecuted groups and is trying to recruit others who share the bloodline. Paul is one of those recruits, along with a multibillionaire hedge fund manager whom Paul befriends when they are both drawn in to this strange netherworld, which (sort of) explains the impersonations of Paul appearing on the Internet.

Sounds weird, right?

I had expected this book to be about modern technology and its negative impact on our lives and relationships, and there is some of that in here. But not much. The book meanders around through Biblical stories, anecdotes about Paul’s patients, explanations about why his prior relationships failed, and Paul’s inner dialogues about God. To be honest, most of this book was incredibly boring. There were flashes of brilliance here and there – and those flashes were bright. Like, laugh out loud, nod-in-the-car type of brilliance. But they were so few and far between that I had to ask myself over and over whether they were worth it for the narrative tedium that extended between them. The answer is no.

By the end of To Rise Again At A Decent Hour, I was quite angry at the book. I found it pretty unpleasant to read. I liked the passages about Paul’s superstition about the Red Sox, and his skewering of random people walking along the Brooklyn Heights Promenade on summer night was hilarious. But the rest – my god, I want those hours back.

I listened to To Rise Again At A Decent Hour on audio. It was narrated by one of my favorite narrators of all time – the sublime Campbell Scott – and I bet that if he hadn’t been narrating, I would have given up on the book. He’s got this gorgeous, deep, perfect voice which I adore, and I’ve loved some of his other audiobooks. But even he couldn’t save this book for me. I kept wondering what HE thought of the book as he was narrating. Was his mind wandering too?

Sorry – can’t recommend this one.

6 Comments

  • Diane@BibliophilebytheSea
    August 29, 2014 - 8:14 pm | Permalink

    just finished this one (audio as well). I’m on the fence and plan to think about it before reviewing. Kinda whacky – yes.

    • gayle
      August 29, 2014 - 10:45 pm | Permalink

      Diane – can’t wait to hear what you thought of it.

  • August 30, 2014 - 6:42 am | Permalink

    I think I reacted like you (only a bit more positively). The good parts were very good, but oh, he could have used a lot of editing! LOL

  • September 2, 2014 - 11:55 am | Permalink

    I have this one on my Kindle but I got it from the library so no money was lost. I plan to give it a go but knowing how you felt, I will drop it like a hot potato if I don’t care for it after 50 pages in.

    • gayle
      September 2, 2014 - 2:29 pm | Permalink

      The first 50 pages are probably the best… Let me know what happens.

  • September 3, 2014 - 7:41 am | Permalink

    Thank you. I thought I was the only one who hated this book. I did like the audio production, but I can’t believe how many people thought this book was good. Ugh. I doubt I’ll give Ferris another try. Glad you found the flashes of brilliance; I was so bored I don’t remember that were any such flashes. I listened to this one for a freelance review, so was forced to keep going. *I want my time back too!* (at least I got paid. LOL)

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